Do you have “tourists” going to your church? (Are you one of them?)

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Recently, I wrote a post encouraging people to read one of my favorite books, “Gospel Treason” by Brad Bigney.

In that book, there is a very thought-provoking passage in there from Elyse Fitzpatrick describing how going to church for many people is like a European vacation that she went on:

“A number of years ago, my husband and I had the wonderful opportunity to vacation in Europe. In about three an a half weeks we visited thirteen different nations. When we’d enter a country, we’d get our passports stamped, exchange currencies, learn a few key phrases, and then off we’d go to visit the natives. We’d walk through outdoor markets , peruse museums, sample the cuisine. We’d exchange a few niceties with the locals, sit on the steps of cathedrals, watch the life of the town go by, take a picture or two, and purchase a little something to remind us of our time there, and then we were off. We had a wonderful vacation. Our hearts weren’t changed in any significant ways by our little visits, but then they weren’t meant to be. We were tourists. It seems to me that what I’ve just described is very close to many people’s understanding of the congregational life of the local church. On any given Sunday or better yet, Saturday night, many tourists can be found in church. They pop in for forty-five minutes or an hour, sing a chorus or two, exchange niceties with the locals: “Hi! How are you?” “Fine!” “How are you ?” “Fine! Nice Fellowshipping. With you!” They sample some of the local cuisine, they might purchase a book or CD to remind them of their visit, and then they race to their cars to get to their favorite restaurant before the rush or home before the game. For many people, church is simply a place to go to once a week . It’s about being a tourist, and our land is filled with tourist-friendly churches. Pop in, pop out, do your religious thing, catch ya later!”

I’d like to ask you to be honest. Does that in any way describe you?
I’m not saying that going to church makes you a Christian, any more than your going to a football game makes you a football player.

But one thing your church attendance does is reveal something about your attitude and beliefs about the importance (and understanding) of your relationship with God (and your own spiritual health).

If you are not a regular church attendee, please be careful:
Proverbs 18:1 says a that “a man who isolates himself seeks his own desire”
Hebrews 10:25 says “not to forsake the assembling of ourselves together, as is the habit of some, but come together and look for ways to stir one another. Up to love and good deeds.”

Let me encourage you this week to get to church and while there, ask yourself whether you are a tourist, or a local (one of the native peoples) ?
After asking yourself that question, try two more: would God be pleased with my answer to that last question.

Lastly, in what specific ways, can I get more involved at my local church?

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“Gospel Treason”—-trust me on this one

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Ever since I submitted my life to the lordship of Jesus Christ back in June of 1982, I have been involved in numerous Bible studies and have been a voracious reader.

Some of the readers of my blog know me well, for some others, you are beginning to better understand my heart and mind as you read through these posts.

All that said, I’m asking you to trust me on this one and take my advice: read the book “Gospel Treason” by Brad Bigney.

To say that God has used this book in my own spiritual growth and in the lives of those in a small group I attend would be a big understatement.

It really is that good.

A huge influence on my life once said that if you are looking to grow in your walk with God….if you really want it (Him) to mean something, moving beyond just “feeling or acting religious”, then strive to know God better and honestly, strive to get to know your self better.

Reading this book will help you in both ways. Trust me—read it.

“Is this water going to be refreshing or bad for me”?

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Many of the posts I write about have to do with perspective.  I believe its because of the perspective we have on things that cause us to act like we do.  One of my favorite things are M&M’s.   When I see a bowl of M&M’s, I know  that as soon as I scoop up my first handful, a smile will come to my taste buds and I will feel happier.  That’s weird to say that, huh? (although I’m sure you can probably relate).

However, like eating one potato chip (I don’t think its possible), one handful of M&M’s is nearly impossible for me to do.

I think one scoop will satisfy, but it won’t. So, I take another one, and another.  Pretty soon, my happy feelings turn into a kind of yucky feeling.

I think life is like that.  We all face so many choices throughout our days and its the wisdom of our perspective that makes all the difference between having a deep feeling of contentment, or “need for more attitude that leads to yuckiness”.

Recently, I was reminded of this “perspective in our choices” kind of issue after reading  Brad Bigney’s excellent book, “Gospel Treason”.  Here are a few notes from it that I took:

-God doesn’t just give you satisfaction. Rather than merely giving you water, He establishes IN  YOU a fountain of living water
its as though we’re in a boat surrounded by what looks like refreshing , thirst-quenching water, but its full of salt. Everything outside of God in Christ is saltwater, and it only leaves you thirstier  than you were before.
-enjoy the stuff of this world, but don’t live for them.. They cannot sustain you. You were made for something bigger, better, fuller.   You were made for an appetite for God, and nothing else will satisfy. .   
-1 Tim. 6:17c (ESV) , says “God richly provides us with everything to enjoy. “
-So, if you have them (the material stuff in this world), enjoy them. Thank God for them. Just don’t get lost in the gift and forget the Giver . Only God Himself can satisfy.
-Idolatry is a threat to your soul.
Although there is so much around you that would seem to bring you an immediate sense of enjoyment, take the time my friend to evaluate the bigger picture.   Are you, in actuality believing that some  thing or person will bring you a lasting satisfaction and fulfillment, when only a personal relationship with the living and loving God can do that?    As good as this “obvious choice” looks, will my yielding to it be good for me, or something harmful?