Is your team a bit dysfunctional? (Patrick Lencioni excerpt)

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Victories happens through teamwork.  There are just too many responsibilities that have to be executed for any one individual to take credit for a project’s or organization’s success.

However, as most of us, if not all of us know, working with others can be a challenge.  But, successful organizations find a way to acknowledge and work through their differences to come together to accomplish much.

With that intro in mind, I found this excerpt from Patrick Lencioni’s excellent book, “Overcoming the Five dysfunctions of a team” to give me much to think about.  Although the book talks about five dysfunctions, I think there is enough to think about just by reading through these notes and looking to ways to apply them:

“DYSFUNCTION #1—BUILDING TRUST
– there is no quality or characteristic more important than trust.—most of my work involves this issue
-there is no quality or characteristic that is as rare as trust—-if you can tackle this, then there is great potential for great things to happen
-trust is all about vulnerability—the idea of this is that if people are willing to be open about themselves, they are also going to be the kind of people not being devisive, or overly ambitious, or political
-people have a difficulty admitting their weaknesses, faults, mistakes, even when there is real data showing it
and then if the boss won’t accept it about themselves, then others will tend to be unwilling to stand up alone to confront their boss
-people have a desire for self-preservation—the idea of putting themselves at risk for the good of others is not natural and is rarely rewarded in life
—teams need to have courage to be vulnerable —to admit they have weaknesses and that others are more gifted in some area
-teams must be willing to take risks without a guarantee of success.”
_____________________________________________________________________________________________________
How trusting of each other are the members of your team?
How open and vulnerable are people regularly at meetings and in side conversations?
Are making mistakes “tolerated” in your organization?   (is that a good thing?)
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